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May 21, 2015

Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross on this day in 1881.

 

Today on StandUP!

 

At the top of the show, we ran diagnostics on David Letterman’s final outing as host of The Late Show. Like most good finales, it left us with a full heart, a teary eye and a smile. Although…there are still a few things that linger

Our first guest of the day was Barbara Ortiz Howard, founder of Women On 20s, the grassroots organization leading the call for some gender diversity on U.S. currency. It may seem like a foolish idea to you right up until the moment you ask yourself, “why not?” and “why am I searching for a valid reason to defend the status quo?” and “why can’t I find any good reason not to have at least ONE dang woman on a dang gum twenty dollar bill?”

Yesterday, after the show, Pete made his way downtown and backstage at the New York Ideas Festival, the last big precursor to The Atlantic and Aspen Institute’s Aspen Ideas Festival in late June/early July. Pete brought back a great talks with The Today Show’s Willie Geist and Atlantic’s editor-in-chief and president, James Bennett.

Then, the president of advocacy group Public Citizen, Robert Weissman, joined Pete to go in-depth on the recent ruling AGAINST 5 major, major banks in the LIBOR scandal and inside the idea of free public education paid for with a Wall Street tax.

Lastly, we continued Criminal Justice Week, this time talking Mass Incarceration with former New York City ADA and current Senior Counsel in the Justice Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, Lauren-Brooke Eisen. Here, Eisen talks about the dramatic rise in America’s rate of incarceration since 1990:

 

 

Now, if you’ll excuse me I have to fill out this internship application for the Letterman show.

 

-c.

 

 

Miss the show? Catch it here. Listen to some of our favorite interviews here

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Late (Morning) Show

May 20, 2015

So long, Dave.

 

Today on StandUP!

 

Criminal Justice Week rolled on for a record breaking THIRD day! You can reminisce about all the good times we had and learn how to stay out of prison at the SiriusXM blog.

Wednesday’s first non crime-related guest was Stephen Walt, the Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Affairs at Harvard University whose recent piece in Foreign Policy on what Mankind’s situation on Earth will look like in the year 2050 gave us a lot to think about. If you thought rent was out of control now, just wait until there are 50 million more of us…

In the second hour, we had the honor to spend some time in-studio with iconic actor Ray Liotta. If you have no appreciation for Goodfellas or Field of Dreams, you may be reading the wrong recap. Ray Liotta was in to talk up the new 5 part docudrama Texas Rising, premiering this coming Monday on History Channel, but really what he did was service our fanboy nature by being pretty cool.

The last case on today’s docket was Mark Osler, former prosecutor in Detroit and current Professor of Law at University of St. Thomas. Mr. Osler and Pete talked about the mandatory minimum drug sentencing and it’s destructive effect on Americans. Here, Osler explains his transition from prosecutor to activist:

 

 

 

Now, if you’ll excuse me I have to redefine late night programming for an entire generation.

 

-c.

 

 

Miss the show? Catch it here. Listen to some of our favorite interviews here

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Syzygy

May 19, 2015

 

8 planets in our solar system will align on one side of the sun, on this day in 2161. See you then!

 

Today on StandUP!

Daily Beast editor-in-chief John Avlon called us up in the first hour to talk commencement speeches and American policy, both foreign and domestic.

Juan Cole is the Richard P. Mitchell professor of History at the University of Michigan and author of “The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East.” And here I thought Millennials were just an American problem…

Criminal Justice Week rolled on with a look at police tactics and protocol with John Jay College of Criminal Justice professor of Law and Police Science, Eugene O’Donnell. In this clip, Mr. O’Donnell explains that, in his view, body cameras will not be helpful when it comes to policing:

 

Our last guest on this Tuesday was Ricky Schroder, whose childhood role in “Silver Spoons” is legendary. Last year, Schroder spent 4 months with a documentary film crew in Afghanistan, recording the lives and missions of US troops in that region. You can catch “Fighting Season” tonight at 9pm EDT on DirectTV’s Audience Network, and on iTunes beginning tomorrow.

Now, if you’ll excuse me I have to buy another pair of pants and wear them until they fall apart.

 

-c.

 

 

Miss the show? Catch it here. Listen to some of our favorite interviews here

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(Criminal) Justice is Served

May 18, 2015

Mad Men ended it’s run on AMC last night, so have a Coke.

 

Today on StandUP!

I don’t know how to sugar coat this: bees are dying. Even worse, we don’t have a clear, resolute reason why. University of Maryland asst. professor of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, joined us to dissect the issue, remind us of the importance of a healthy bee population, and to discuss his work as director of the Bee Informed Partnership.

Next, CNN’s chief business correspondent, Christine Romans, checked in from uptown to talk finance and take your calls. Christine’s new book, “Smart is the New Rich: Money Guide for Millennials,” is geared toward helping the next generation of American’s avoid the financial mistakes that have plagued America’s hardworking, good-looking, comically gifted and highly intellectual radio producers. Ahem.

Today also kicked off Criminal Justice Week, and we had two great guests who took a micro and macro look at the topic.

New York Times’ investigative journalist Deborah Sontag’s latest piece is all about the effort to diminish and hopefully eliminate a long-standing element of life behind bars: sexual assault. Once considered a deterrent to crime or something a criminal “deserves,” prison rape had finally come to be seen for the addressable, nightmarish issue that it is, although the cause doesn’t have the push it once had.

Then, we were joined in-studio by Jed Shugerman, associate professor at Fordham Law School and author of, “The People’s Courts: The Rise of Judicial Elections and Judicial Power in America.” Jed provided a great history of the US court system and explained the democratic positives and negatives of an elected judiciary. Below, Jed reveals to Pete the international origins of our all-american courts:

 

And the religious-basis for some of our most tried and true judicial beliefs:

 

 

Criminal Justice Week continues tomorrow with John Jay professor and former NYPD officer, Eugene O’Donnell, on police tactics and policy.

 

Now, if you’ll excuse me I am going to think about why our favorite TV shows are about generally unlikable professions.

 

-c.

 

 

Miss the show? Catch it here. Listen to some of our favorite interviews here

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